Category Archives: blog

Making Lap Lap in Vanuatu

Lap lap is a traditional Vanuatu dish wrapped in leaves and cooked above ground on hot stones. Mangaliliu Village has a strong heritage in making lap lap and this was seen when staying in the village recently.

Starting at 6 AM (photography in this light was a treat) the lap lap was made on Sunday morning by the women and children from the extended family for lunch following a session in Church.

With no fridge available two chickens were freshly slaughtered for the occasion and were plucked by the children. Aside from the lap lap faol seen here (chicken), other versions are dakdak (duck), fis (fish), mit (meat), taro, maniok (cassava), yam and banana. There are also regional variations.

Please click any photograph to view slideshow.

Running of the Sheep in France | Murray Lloyd Photography

The Fete de la Transhumance is celebrated in St Remy de Provence annually on Whit Monday. This traditional French festival commemorates the days farmers trekked for days to take their sheep from drought stricken lowland in search of greener pasture in the mountains.

Close up of sheep dog looking interested in crowd of poeple
I am sure Van Goph (sans left ear) would have appreciated the 3000 sheep, goats and donkeys being herded through the town for the 31st Fete de la Transhumance. He was living (self-admitted) in an asylum in St Remy between 1889 and 1890. The river of sheep winding through the narrow streets of the town resembled a readymade impressionist painting.

Photographers in action on street in St Remy de Provence
Unlike the running of the bulls in Pamplona, no instant fines were handed out to people with cameras. The sheep did two laps of the town before departing ‚Äď I hope they did not notice the menus.

Leapard skin clothes on two youg girls.Infatable horse at the Fete de la TranshumanceWoman with shaggy hair in street.Fete de la TranshumanceFarmer herding sheep in street at the Fete de la Transhumancein St Remy de ProvenceSheep in street at the Fete de la Transhumancein St Remy de ProvenceSheep in street at the Fete de la Transhumancein St Remy de ProvenceSheep in street at the Fete de la Transhumancein St Remy de ProvenceBoys playing with sheep at the Fete de la Transhumance in St Remy de Provencesheep at the Fete de la Transhumance in St Remy de ProvenceFete de la Transhumance at st remy de provence, france.Black dog watching sheep in parade.

French restaurant sign advertising rack of lamb.

Carre d’agneau translates to rack of lamb

Wellington on a Plate Pipi Trail | Murray Lloyd Photography

Wellington on a plate Pipi Trail

Queenie Rikihana and Ruth Pretty welcome guests at Rangiatea Church

Queenie Rikihana and Ruth Pretty welcome guests at Rangiatea Church

Queenie Rikihana explains history of Rangiatea grounds

Queenie explains history of the Rangiatea grounds

Andre Baker explains the hammerhead shark design in the kneeler cushions in Rangiatea Church

Andre Baker explains the hammerhead shark design in the kneeler cushions in Rangiatea Church

...and teaches the guests to sing this song

…and teaches the guests to sing this song

No pipi but there was a John Dory

No pipi but there was a John Dory

Elaine Bevan explains weaving at Te Whare Toi in Otaki

Elaine Bevan explains weaving at Te Whare Toi in Otaki

...that's me in the foreground

…that’s me in the foreground…at Raukawa Marae

Rewana bread ready to go at Raukawa Marae in Otaki

Rewana bread ready to go at Raukawa
Marae in Otaki

Pipi fritters

Ruth Pretty’s Pipi Fritters

Wellington on a plate Pipi TrailWellington on a plate Pipi Trail

Tootsie Iriha's fried bread...with butter and golden syrup, yum

Tootsie Iriha’s fried bread…with butter and golden syrup, yum

Wellington on a plate Pipi Trail

Queenie Rikihana gives tips about fishing up pipis

Queenie Rikihana gives tips about fishing up pipis

Wellington on a plate Pipi Trail

Ruth Pretty looks forward to Tootsie Iriha's famous fried bread

Ruth looks forward to Tootsie Iriha’s famous fried bread

Tootsie Iriha and Queenie Rikihana

Tootsie Iriha and Queenie Rikihana

Wellington on a plate Pipi TrailWellington on a plate Pipi TrailWellington on a plate Pipi TrailWellington on a plate Pipi Trail

Aunty Hira flips her very delicate pikelets

Aunty Hira flips her very delicate pikelets

Ruth Pretty hands out Rewana bread starter to guests as they leave

Ruth hands out Rewana bread starter to guests as they leave

Martinborough Olive Harvest Fest | Murray Lloyd Photography

Sign advertising Martinborough Olive Festival

Helen Meehan explains Olivo Oil at Martinborough Hotel

Helen Meehan explains Olivo Oil at one of the long lunches which opened the Olive Harvest Festival at Martinborough Hotel

Olivo Oils served at Martinborough Hotel.

Olivo Oils served at Martinborough Hotel

Guests dining at Martinborough Hotel as part of olive harvest festival.

Peter and Ruth Graham from Atutahi at Tirohana Estate.

Peter and Ruth Graham from Atutahi at Tirohana Estate

Lamb Cutlets poached in Tuscan Blend Olive Oil (from Atutahi) with baby potatoes, cherry tomatoes, gremolata of hazelnut, mint, lemon and parsley.

Lamb Cutlets poached in Tuscan Blend Olive Oil (from Atutahi) with baby potatoes, cherry tomatoes, gremolata of hazelnut, mint, lemon and parsley photographed in situ at Tirohana Estate

Peter Graham talks to guests at Martinborough Olive Harvest Festival

Margaret and Mike Hanson from Blue Earth Olive Oil,  photographed at Poppies Martinborough

Margaret and Mike Hanson from Blue Earth Olive Oil, photographed at Poppies Martinborough

A dessert at Poppies Restaurant, Creme Inglesa with Barcelona inspired Trifle .

The dessert at Poppies was Creme Inglesa, Barcelona inspired Trifle (Blue Earth Olive Oil was in the bottom layer). Photographed in situ at Poppies.

Jared Gulian with his newly published book Moon over Martinborough.

Jared Gulian with his newly published book Moon over Martinborough

International Olive Oil Judge Margaret Edwards explains how to taste olive oil.

International Olive Oil Judge Margaret Edwards explains how to judge olive oil at the Olive Oil Masterclass

Guests smelling olive oil at Martinborough Olive Harvest Festival.Guests tasting olive oil at Martinborough Olive Harvest Festival.

Margaret Edwards helps blend individual oils for the class to take home.

Margaret Edwards helps blend individual oils for the class to take home

Martinborough Hotel at night.

Martinborough Hotel from the Night Market

Night Market at Martinborough Olive Harvest Festival.

Martinborough Olive Harvest festival Night Market

Visitors at Night Market at Martinborough Olive Harvest Festival.

The Olivo crew at Martinborough Olive Harvest night market.

The Olivo crew at the night market

Misty landscape at Martinborough.

A cool one degrees Sunday morning ready to harvest by hand

Ray Lilley of Whiterock Olives holding fresh olives.

Ray Lilley of White Rock Olives

Young girl picking olives in morning sunlight.

Picking at White Rock Olives

Picking olives at White Rock Olives in Martinborough.Picking olives at White Rock Estate in Martinborough.

Nalini Baruch giving cooking demonstration at Lot 8, Martinborough.

Nalini Baruch presented gourmet salad dressings the at Lot 8 commercial kitchen

Narlini Baruch giving a cooking demonstration at Martinborough Olive Harvest Festival

Orange slices with sea salt and Lot Eight 2013 Aromatic Olice Oil.

Nalini Baruch’s Orange slices with sea salt and Lot Eight 2013 Aromatic Olive Oil

Close up photo of hands holding green olives in sun.

Malaysian Night Market at WOAP | Murray Lloyd Photography

Described as the ‚ÄúJamie Oliver of Malaysian cooking‚ÄĚ, Chef Wan was the undoubted star of the inaugural Wellington Malaysia Kitchen Night Market. A household name in Asia , crowds clamoured to hear him speak about and cook traditional Malaysian food. The packed audience included a very excited Lauren King, who was one of the lucky recipients of Chef Wan’s demonstration¬†dish Vermicelli Kerabu.

Held in one half of the cramped Opera House Lane, the market was the finale of this years Wellington On A Plate. Wan’s excited commentary (see him in action here), broadcast at full volume, contrasted with the slow moving crowds waiting for their fix of Malaysian cuisine.

Working under intense pressure the chefs from Kayu Manis, Rasa, The Long Bar and other Wellington Malaysian restaurants still managed to serve up delicious char grilled satay sticks, curry puffs, rendangs and gorengs …

…the menus however lacked the real diversity I expected of Malaysian street food. This was a probably a reflection on having only a small number of stands to feed the heaving crowds quickly (the event ran for 3 hrs), with easily identified food.

The fundamental aim of Wellington On A Plate is to attract foodie tourists. Air Asia X ‚Äės arrival to NZ has seen a dramatic increase in Malaysian visitors to NZ (1300 to 5000 monthly in Christchurch) ‚Äď no doubt coming for the clean green scenery. Likewise, tourism from NZ to Malaysia has increased markedly. I applaud the organisers of the Kitchen Night Market for getting involved with WOAP for the first time, but there is room to put Malaysian street food on a larger stage, with more variety and enthusiastic crowds in the future.

Happy Feet the penguin, at WOAP | Murray Lloyd Photography

Raw meat, furry tails and live insects were on the menu at a recent Ruth Pretty Catering event. In weather more appropriate for emperor penguins, Wellington Zoo was host to the Ruth Pretty Zoo Safari, part of Wellington on a Plate.

Perhaps reluctantly swapping the heated floor of Kamala‚Äôs, the swish new zoo venue (named after the zoo’s last elephant), the visitors were soon being educated about animal diets in the zoo kitchen.

Possum tails hang out of bucket at Zoo Safari at Wellington on a plate

Slabs of horse meat, goat legs – fur and all, and live locusts were all sighted, but most interest centered on chimpanzee food. Paul Horton, the carnivore keeper said ‚Äúchimps are pretty much like us, they will happily kill a monkey and share it around‚ÄĚ, dispelling any thoughts about vegetarian diets. As well as fruit and veges, the chimps are occasionally fed whole chickens, cooked, to avoid salmonella. Bread used to be part of the chimp diet until Jess, a female, took such a liking to it she upsized to become the largest chimp in the tribe ‚Äď not the normal way of things in the ape world.

Climatic extremes continued on a short tour of the zoo, taking in Happy Feet the emperor penguin, and Sasa and Sean the sun bears. Happy Feet tentatively looked like coming out and diving into the pool (a zoo first), but after dipping a ‚Äėtoe‚Äô into the water, turned around, and waddled back inside.

In a similar manner the guests made their way back to the warmth of Kamala’s where a South African high tea awaited.

The safari themes were continued with the menu including biltong, hertzoggies, and snoek pate and wait, was that…Dr Livingston I presume?

Wild Food Festival Photos | Murray Lloyd Photography

The famous¬†Wildfoods Festival¬†is a shock awaiting anyone used to romantic farmers’ markets or sterilised supermarket offerings.

On the menu one¬†year you could¬†get a shot of horse semen washed down with Red Bull.¬† Among the culinary highlights on my last visit were seagulls bottoms, bull’s penis sausages (3000 made from 40kgs), worm slammers (rumour had it the worms were sourced from a local graveyard), and live or chocolate coated huhu grubs.

The more restrained dishes on offer included sliced, pickled fern trunks, whitebait in various guises, and Hoki -Tikka from the local Indian curry house.  Wild indeed.

Please click on any photo to view slideshow.

Prize winning cupcakes at NZ show | Murray Lloyd Photography

The highlight for me at the Levin A&P show last week was the Home Industry display.  In amongst the Christmas puddings, fruitcakes and scones were two entries for cupcakes. I was told this was only the second year cupcakes had been accepted, perhaps reflecting the slow pace of change away from the city (where all the talk has now switched to macaroons).

Other highlights were the  jams, and vegetable creations.  Outside in the pens was the usual fluttering of ribbons amongst the winning pigs, chickens, sheep and cattle. However  I noticed the prizewinning export lambs were not getting carried away by their win. For those technology buffs РI photographed the A&P show on an old Mamiya C330 Twin Lens Reflex camera using roll film.

Sign advertising home industries at Levin A&P show in New ZealandPrize winning cupcakes at A&P Show in Levin, New Zealand.Prize winning jams at Levin A&P show in New Zealand.Vege creations made by children at Levin A&P show in New Zealand.

Shepherds Shemozle in Hunterville | Murray Lloyd Photography

In Hunterville around Oct/Nov is one of the highlights on New Zealand’s event calendar. The day features the Miss Hunterway Competition – “a beauty show for real bitches”, a Dog barking sound off and the Shepherds’ Shemozzle – a race pitting man and dog against other men and dogs along a fear factor type course (they do one for kids as well).

In the past the notorious food stop has included – sheep eyes, pints of cream, bread buns, raw eggs, pints of beer, freshly dug carrots (with dirt), warm coca cola, bulls testicles, and vinegar. The food is expected to be forced down at the food stop as fast as possible by red-faced shepherds having just run/jumped and crawled several kilometers with their ever faithful dogs beside them all the way.

Hohepa Biodynamic Cheese in NZ | Murray Lloyd Photography

Multiple¬†awards in the Cuisine cheese awards establish Hohepa as one of New Zealand’s preeminent boutique cheese making operations. The staff at Hohepa¬†could not have been more generous with their time while I photographed the cheese making operation in Hawkes Bay.